The BEST Episodes of Globe Trekker

Every episode ever - ranked by fan votes!

Last Updated: Oct 5, 2021

Network: PBS

Globe Trekker takes to on journeys to countries from every continent around the globe. Each unforgettable destination is hosted by one of the Globe Trekker team members, who dare to try or eat anything new. Join veteran Ian Wright, Justine Shapiro, Megan McCormick and their teammates on their journeys by tuning in your local PBS channels.

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Madagascar

#1 - Madagascar

Season 6 - Episode 6 - Aired Jun 28, 2002

Presenter Ian Wright travels through Madagascar, 'the red island' 250 miles off the east coast of Africa. It's the 4th largest island in the world, with landscapes ranging from rainforest to arid desert, and animal and plant life found nowhere else in the world. His journey begins in Antananarivo (Tana), the capital of Madagascar. Here he learns about the unique history and culture of the Malagasy. The earliest rulers were the highland 'Merina' tribe, and the first king Andrianampoinimerina united the island by marrying one wife from each of the 12 tribes. His granddaughter, Queen Ranavalona, came to power in 1828 and became the most notorious ruler - she threw foreigners out of the country, banned Christianity and slaughtered her own people in the most brutal ways.

star 10.00
1 votes
Tokyo City Guide

#2 - Tokyo City Guide

Season 10 - Episode 9 - Aired Nov 23, 2004

star 9.00
1 votes
Ultimate China

#3 - Ultimate China

Season 10 - Episode 12 - Aired Dec 14, 2004

China, with 1.3 billion people and a land mass larger the U.S., no one would question its incredible diversity. Join Justine Shapiro, Zay Harding and Megan McCormick to travel throughout China, from Beijing, Shanghai, Shenzen, to Hong Kong, You do not want to miss seeing the Great Wall and the Three Gorges Dam.

star 9.00
2 votes
Writers:
Ultimate India

#4 - Ultimate India

Season 10 - Episode 13 - Aired Dec 21, 2004

star 9.00
1 votes
Writers:
New Zealand 2

#5 - New Zealand 2

Season 11 - Episode 8 - Aired Jan 8, 2006

The motivations of those who left China and the impact they've had on their new homes are explored.

star 9.00
2 votes
Southern Mexico

#6 - Southern Mexico

Season 8 - Episode 6 - Aired Oct 21, 2002

Ian starts his journey at the unique Day of the Dead festival in Pazcuaro. After reveling late into the night, he goes to the old colonial town of Guanajuato, where he spends time bull riding with some Mexican cowboy. From there he goes to Acapulco, where he takes in the glitzy nightlife and watersports before watching the famous cliff divers. Continuing his search for the perfect beach, he heads to Puerto Escondido for the annual surfing festival. He then travels to the Mayan ruins of Palenque, before visiting the Zapatista stronghold of San Cristobal. He ends his journey with an amazing trek through the Lancondon jungle.

star 9.00
2 votes
Building England 2: The Age of Architects

#7 - Building England 2: The Age of Architects

Season 16 - Episode 11 - Aired Jul 19, 2015

Conclusion. An architectural tour of England. Included: Queen's House in Greenwich; Christopher Wren's Church of Magnus the Martyr and St. Paul's Cathedral in London; the urban townhomes of Bath; and Osterley House in Middlesex. Also: Hammerwood Lodge in East Sussex; Saltaire in Yorkshire; Trafalgar Square; Buckingham Palace; and the Clifton Suspension Bridge in Bristol.

star 9.00
2 votes
Kenya

#8 - Kenya

Season 8 - Episode 3 - Aired Oct 15, 2002

star 8.80
5 votes
Indian Ocean Islands

#9 - Indian Ocean Islands

Season 11 - Episode 7 - Aired Dec 25, 2005

The Indian Ocean Islands, off the east coast of Africa, are a paradise on earth. With superb resorts, sun-kissed beaches, and sparkling turquoise seas - countless Africans, Indians, Europeans, and even pirates, have all settled in this timeless, tropical location. From horse racing to hedgehog hunting and swimming with whale sharks, to the sheer indulgence of 6-star luxury hotels, traveller Ian Wright samples slow-paced island life at its best with a whole lot of action thrown in! Ian starts his trip in the Republic of Mauritius and the capital city Port-Louis, where he samples some delicious local fare at a street market and learns all about the Dodo in the place where these now extinct, flightless birds once made their home. Then it’s off to the Champ de Mars, the second oldest racecourse in the world, for 'a flutter' on the horses. Next stop is the Flacq region, where Ian stops off at the 6-star Touessrok Hotel to enjoy his racecourse winnings and indulge in a spot of pampering at one of the most luxurious hotels in the whole of the Indian Ocean. Never one to miss a trend, Ian discovers a lot of couples get married in Mauritius, and… just happens to bump into a couple who not only plan to hold their wedding ceremony 20 feet under the sea, but also invite Ian to be their best man! Leaving the underwater world behind, and the newly-weds to enjoy their honeymoon, Ian decides to get back to nature and go in for a spot of hedgehog hunting. He gets to tuck into his first tasty mouthful of a local delicacy called ‘tang’, otherwise known as hedgehog meat. He also makes the acquaintance of a 90-year old giant tortoise, not to mention a whole bunch of hungry crocodiles. And, as if that wasn’t adventurous enough, he heads to Reunion, the ‘Island of Adventure’ and takes to the hills to try his hand at canyoneering - an extreme adventure sport which involves abseiling, sliding, jumping, swimming and climbing down waterfalls and steep canyons. Then it

star 8.80
5 votes
Corsica, Sardinia & Sicily

#10 - Corsica, Sardinia & Sicily

Season 2 - Episode 13 - Aired Nov 15, 1996

Mediterranean islands Corsica, Sardinia and Sicily are the stepping stones between Europe and Africa. Ian Wright begins his journey on the French island of Corsica, throwing himself into every water sport imaginable before heading for the cooler climes of the mountains. Mountains cover a third of Corsica and hikers flock to the peaks and gorges in the Valley of Restonica. From the mountains Ian heads south to Ajaccio. It is the birthplace of the famous French ruler, Napoleon, a fact which you can't escape in this small town where every shop, cafe, restaurant plays on the 'Napoleon theme'. The Italian island of Sardinia is Ian's next port of call, but he has his work cut out to get there: he finds a yacht at the Corsican port of Bonifacio and Ian pays his way to Sardinia as a deck hand/assistant chef. The mountain village of Sedilo is where the S'Ardia takes place, a two day festival in honour of Saint Constantine. Sardinians have a long tradition of fine horsemanship and a high-speed race through the narrow streets is the main feature of the festival. The best way to see Sardinia is by car, so Ian rents an old Fiat Topolino and drives east to Orgosolo. Orgosolo is a former bandit town and is now famous for its powerful political murals. Nearby Ian witnesses the Mammutones perform a folk dance, where black-masked men wearing goat bells representing Moorish prisoners are rounded up by dancers dressed as Sardinian soldiers. Ian leaves the frenetic mountain lifestyle behind him and heads south to the beaches of Costa Verde, also known as 'The Silent Coast'. Continuing his island hopping, Ian catches a ferry to Sicily and journeys to the capital, Palermo. Here he cooks up a storm with a local pasta chef and then tears around town on his rented scooter. The highlight of his trip to Palermo is the Festival of Santa Rosalia, complete with operatic music, flying angels and fireworks. The volcanic island of Stromboli is Ian's final destination. After a

star 8.75
4 votes
Directors: Martin Herring
Writers:
West India

#11 - West India

Season 5 - Episode 2 - Aired Sep 18, 2000

Megan McCormick's journey in one of the ultimate travellers' destinations, West India, begins in the small holy town of Pushkar. Along with hundreds of thousands of visitors, she takes part in the annual religious festival and receives a blessing on the shores of the lake. The town is also famous for its camel fair every November and Megan drives a hard bargain with the traders. After a gruelling 8 hour bus ride north to Bikaner, a remote desert city, Megan puts on a brave face and visits the extraordinary Karnimassar Temple. The temple is filled with rats, which are worshiped as the reincarnations of story tellers. In a small village just outside the city she bears witness to fire-dancing at the Sidh sect festival. The golden city of Jaisalmer, which was built in the 12th century, is at the very heart of Rajasthan. Megan, with her hands freshly adorned with henna, wanders through the market streets and samples Bhang Lassi, the infamous local speciality, at the Jaisalmer Fort. Megan makes the most of the renowned tailors in Udaipur, 'The Venice of the East', and has a traditional Punjabi suit made in just a few hours. Meanwhile a famous astrologer tells Megan what the next few years have in store for her. Megan makes a brief stop at Ranakpur, the site of one of the oldest and most impressive Jain temples in India, before heading 400 miles south by plane to Mumbai, formerly Bombay - the biggest, fastest and richest city in India. Startled by the number of street children in Mumbai, Megan pays a visit to a children's hostel and learns that travellers can volunteer to teach English at the hostel while in Mumbai. Whilst in Mumbai, Megan goes to Bollywood, where 750 feature films are made every year, and meets popular actor Jackie Shroff. Before leaving town Megan samples local cuisine at Juhu Beach, Mumbai's answer to New York's Coney Island. Some people come to India just to visit Pune, the home of the Osho community. Megan takes instruction in the co

star 8.75
4 votes
Africa: Zimbabwe, Botswana & Namibia

#12 - Africa: Zimbabwe, Botswana & Namibia

Season 1 - Episode 13 - Aired Dec 31, 1994

Andrew Daddo explores three very different countries in the south of this great continent, from tranquil serenity of the Zambezi River in Zimbabwe to amazing wildlife in Botswana’s parks and the unspoilt landscapes of Namibia.

star 8.67
3 votes
South Africa & Lesotho

#13 - South Africa & Lesotho

Season 3 - Episode 9 - Aired Mar 20, 1998

Traveller Justine Shapiro Justine Shapiro's journey begins in the cosmopolitan city of Cape Town on the West Coast of South Africa. She visits Robben Island, where President Nelson Mandela was held prisoner for 18 of his 27 years in prison. She speaks to an ex-political prisoner who lived in the cell opposite to Mandela for 7 years. The townships in Cape Town are the scene of much history and political strife. Justine explores a Cape Town township and visits a Sanoma - a South African faith healer. From Cape Town Justine heads east on board the Trans Karoo Express, through the lush wine regions north of Cape Town, then into the arid landscape known as the Great Karoo. She stays with an Africaan family in Laingsaburg and rides an ostrich in Oudtshoorn. After going deep sea fishing in Coffee Bay on the Wild Coast, Justine arrives in South Africa's third largest city, Durban. One a white enclave, Durban's streets now reflect a wide variety of cultures. It has always been home to the largest Indian and Pakistani community in South Africa, and the Kavadi festival in February where devotees celebrate the Hindu God Muruga by allowing their bodies to be pierced all over. Later, Justine hangs out with the young Durban surfers and meets the National Surfing Champion Shane Thorn, before having a go at surfing herself. The next destination is the Zulu homeland north of Durban, where she attends a Zulu ritual and talks with a young Zulu about the history of this warrior tribe. Justine journeys on into the mountain kingdom of Lesotho. A country in itself, it has its own language, culture and currency. The people of Lesotho are known as Basotho and Justine attends a puberty initiation ceremonies for the young teenage boys of the tribe. From Lesotho Justine travels north-west through Lesotho, and back down to the South African border, reaching Ficksburg and Rustlers Valley. Here she stays with a hippie community and experiences a 'sound journey'. Kruger Nati

star 8.67
3 votes
Writers:
Sydney City Guide

#14 - Sydney City Guide

Season 5 - Episode 5 - Aired Dec 1, 2000

Traveller Justine Shapiro spends a week in Sydney, the gateway to Australia. On the eastern Pacific coast in the state of New South Wales, Sydney was the first port of call for the convict ships of the 1800s, carrying their cargo of outcasts from British cities to the penal colonies. The best way to get your bearings in Sydney is to take a ferry tour around the harbour. Justine buys a weekly travel ticket, then finds a cheap hostel to rest her weary backpack in the King's Cross district. On a mission to overcome her fear of heights Justine gets up early to scale Sydney Harbour Bridge. The climb can only be done with an organised group, so in spite of her vertigo Justine is in safe hands and the panoramic harbour view is definitely worth it. Back on terra firma Justine sets off to explore of Sydney's history at The Rocks, an early settlement, and at the Colonial House Museum. Bondi Beach, the most famous beach in the world, is the place to flaunt the body beautiful or just check out the lifeguards. Bondi is also the starting point for the coastal walk, a scenic cliff top promenade which many Sydney-siders incorporate into their fitness regime. En route to the Waverley Cemetery, which is surrounded by stunning coastal vistas, there's the less populated Tamarama Beach and Bronte Beach, more popular with the locals but no less spectacular. For all its European heritage Australia's closest neighbours are Asian countries. The Sydney suburb Cabramatta is populated by a vast Vietnamese community. Also of non-European descent are the Aboriginal peoples, who, although they lived on the land for 64,000 years before the arrival of the first convict ships, have only been counted as citizens since the referendum of 1967. Justine joins a tour which takes in cultural aspects of aboriginal life and gives an insight into the way the Aborigines have been brutally treated by the European colonisers. Justine ventures outside the city limits to Katoomba, gateway to the B

star 8.67
3 votes
Tunisia and Libya

#15 - Tunisia and Libya

Season 7 - Episode 10 - Aired Sep 23, 2002

The lively markets of Tunis; hunting with desert greyhounds; cave dwelling in Matmata; the souks of Tripoli; Roman ruins at Leptis Magna.

star 8.67
3 votes
Hong Kong & Taiwan

#16 - Hong Kong & Taiwan

Season 9 - Episode 10 - Aired Oct 19, 2003

Megan McCormick visits Hong Kong and travels from there to the remote Orchid Island.

star 8.67
3 votes
Sri Lanka & The Maldives

#17 - Sri Lanka & The Maldives

Season 6 - Episode 4 - Aired Jun 14, 2002

Traveller Megan McCormick heads beyond the southern tip of India, to two of the most beautiful tropical locations on earth: Sri Lanka and the Maldive Islands. Colombo, the capital of Sri Lanka, has been an important trading port and commercial centre since the 1870s. It here that Megan begins her trip, travelling around town on a bajajs and sampling some exotic foods. From Colombo Megan sets our along the coast for Matara. On the way she sees toddy-tappers at work high in the coconut trees and stops off at Weligama, where the local industry is a peculiar type of fishing: stilt fishing. Megan wades out to the stilts embedded into the seabed and tries her hand with little success. Next day she reaches Matara and just outside the town is the temple of Wewurukannala, site of Sri Lanka's largest statue of Buddha. In Buttula Megan stays at a sanctuary called Yala Tissa. It's situated in the midst of beautiful countryside where reforestation programmes are in progress. She then takes a bus to Arugam Bay, a fantastic place for hardcore surfers but also an area which has been caught in the crossfire of the civil war between the government and Tamil rebels. Megan sees the evidence of political turmoil first hand when she takes a tour of the bombed cinema. From Arugam Bay Megan hitches a ride to Ratnapura, which means 'City of Gems'. This is the town where miners come to sell their gems to the dealers the most abundant being pink and blue sapphires and the occasional ruby. Megan goes down the nearby mine accompanied by a guide - it's a terrifying experience but they do find some topaz to reward their efforts. Megan then hires a car to drive up into the hills to visit the tea plantations. Also in hill country is Pinjnewala, home of the famous elephant orphanage. The parents of the orphan elephants have been poached for their ivory and Megan hears some incredible stories about the backgrounds of the animals that live here. A few miles up the road is Sigiriya, the

star 8.60
5 votes
Australia: The South East

#18 - Australia: The South East

Season 1 - Episode 7 - Aired Dec 31, 1994

Ian Wright’s antipodean adventure begins at the huge international Country and Western festival in Tamworth, New South Wales. After sampling the music, dancing and rodeos, he hitches to Byron Bay on the North coast of the province, where he hang-glides high above the miles of golden beaches. He also runs into some bikers and comes away with the ultimate souvenir of his trip – a tattoo. Ian heads south, via Sydney to Albury and the vast Mount Buffalo National Park. His riding skills are put to the test as he embarks on a horse trek through the High Plains. He views of the blue mountain ranges ate breath-taking, and it is the perfect setting for bush camping and sleeping out under the stars. Ian hops on a train to Melbourne, where he finds work in a coffee bar. After a few altercations with the cappuccino machine he saves enough to invest in an old car, with which he hopes to explore Victoria. Things don’t quite go according to plan, however, as the car breaks down and he’s forced to go on alone. After going rock climbing in the Grampian Mountains, Ian takes a flight to Tasmania. The Asbestos National Park in the north of this island is home to large communities of Australia’s national animal, the kangaroo. Ian also comes face to face with wallabies and wombats. Mountain bike is his preferred mode of transport, and he starts on a tour all around the island. Near Bicheno he stays with a farmer in Tasmanian Devil country. Ian journeys to the South West Wilderness National Park, where he is taken on a tour through the mysterious black lagoons and estuaries teeming with local wildlife. His journey ends on a more sombre note, with a visit to Port Arthur, the prison in which Australia’s first white settlers, the British convicts were incarcerated.

star 8.50
6 votes
East Africa: Tanzania & Zanzibar

#19 - East Africa: Tanzania & Zanzibar

Season 2 - Episode 8 - Aired Aug 2, 1995

Ian Wright’s African adventure takes him from the historic slavery island of Zanzibar to Tanzania, from bustling Dar Es Salaam to fantastic wildlife, nature and treks – tackling the mighty Kilimanjaro.

star 8.50
2 votes
Writers:
Pakistan

#20 - Pakistan

Season 3 - Episode 4 - Aired Feb 5, 1998

Traveller Neil Gibson Pakistan was formed by the division of India half a century ago, and founded in the name of Islam. Few Western people venture here but as traveller Neil Gibson discovers it offers some of Asia's most mind-blowing landscapes, a kaleidoscope of cultures and a deeply generous people. His journey begins in Karachi, a bustling port town. He comes across a film crew making a movie on the life of Jinnah, and takes the opportunity to find out more about the founder of Pakistan. Leprosy is still a massive problem amongst the poor in Karachi and Neil visits one of the hospitals that treats lepers. Neil then takes a horse and cart to the Saddar Bazaar, Karachi's main shopping area, and gets himself kitted out in a shalwar kamiz, Pakistan's native dress. From Karachi, it's a 17 hour train ride north to the sufi city of Multan, inhabited by the ancient Indus valley civilisation. The 4000 year old city is home to the mystical side of Islam and Neil arrives in time for the Urs festival, where every year the holy men come to chill out and trance out. Neil has his fortune told by a bird, has his turban stuffed with onions and rides a camel to the spectacular Derawar Fort in the midst of the Cholistan desert. Neil's next stop is Lahore, once the centre of the Mogul empire and considered to be Pakistan's cultural and artistic capital. Here Neil visits the last bastion of British colonialism, Aitchinson College where Imran Khan was once a pupil, and visits the incredible Badshahi mosque, one of the largest mosques in the world. Neil learns about the strict lifestyle required by the Koran and takes part in some Kushti wrestling. A bus journey 440 kilometres north-west takes Neil to the frontier town of Peshawar. Due to it's proximity to Afghanistan, the town is full of smuggled goods and as Neil discovers, it is possible to buy almost anything in the markets. Neil then visits the legendary Khyber Pass and looks out at the real-life 'Gateway to India'

star 8.50
2 votes
Directors: Luke Campbell
Writers:
Outback Australia

#21 - Outback Australia

Season 3 - Episode 5 - Aired Feb 12, 1998

Traveller Ian Wright Covering three quarters of the continent of Australia, the Outback is one of the most sparse and rugged landscapes in the world. Ian Wright begins his journey in Darwin, where many travellers meet before trekking through the Outback. From Darwin Ian passes through Kakadu National Park where he feeds the crocodiles and encounters a black headed python. From there he journeys to Katherine in time for the Barunga Aboriginal Festival of sports and culture. Cloncurry used to be the biggest copper producer in the British Empire, but these days the town is rather quieter. Ian is invited to participate in a Kangaroo hunt, which he does somewhat reluctantly. He also tries his hand at Bush Poetry with a little help from the locals. The next leg of Ian's journey takes him to Alice Springs where he looks at some Aboriginal Art and experiences working life on a cattle station covering a modest 300,000 acres of land. After all that hard work, Ian finds the most luxurious way to travel, floating in a hot air balloon over Alice Springs. About three hundred miles South West of Alice is Australia's most famous natural landmark - Ayers Rock. It's now known as Uluru, and Ian meets some of the few Aborigine people who still live around here. The area was home to the Anangu aborigines for thousands of years but now that it has become a major tourist attraction only a few communities remain. Ian heads north west along the 600 mile Tanami track which links Alice Springs and Hall Creek in Western Australia. Whilst travelling through the desert Ian eats a bush grub dug up on the roadside and also dines on kangaroo tail. Another four hundred miles west of Halls Creek, Ian visits the coastal town of Broome. At night he sees light reflecting on the mud flats, known locally as the staircase to the moon. He also visits an area around Cape Leveque, home to aborigines known as the Bardi people, where he is shown how to catch crabs. The final leg of his jour

star 8.50
2 votes
Directors: Jenny Dames
Writers:
Philippines

#22 - Philippines

Season 3 - Episode 10 - Aired Mar 27, 1998

Traveller Shilpa Mehta Shilpa visits some of the Philippines' 7000 islands. She begins her journey in the town of Baguio on the island of Luzon, where she visits the giant statue of Marcos and finds out what life was like in the Philippines during his rule. She also visits a faith healer renowned for his ability to perform surgery without the use of tools or incisions. From here, Shilpa takes the bus and journeys south to Sagada through the beautiful Filipino countryside, where she visits the famous Hanging Coffins and the amazing rice terraces, often considered to be the eighth Wonder of the World. Next stop San Fernando, where every year on Good Friday incredible real-life crucifixions take place as a form of penance. Shilpa travels south to Manila to witness one of the Philippines' most popular sports, cockfighting. She meets a karaoke singing taxi driver and goes to one of the busy ballroom dancing nightclubs, as well as seeing evidence of the darker side of Manila - child prostitution. A local outrigger boat takes Shilpa to the island of Boracay and its stunning beaches. She explores the old part of Boracay on horseback and goes diving around the corals off its exotic shores. Shilpa's next stop is the island of Negros, the sugarland of the Philippines, and the town of Bacolod. She travels on the vintage steam engines still used on this plantation, the largest in the world, and visits the beautiful but controversial Saint Joseph's Chapel. From Negros Shilpa travels to Davao on the island of Mindanao, where she samples local delicacies such as roast pig, the Durian fruit that 'tastes like heaven and smells like hell' and a popular aphrodisiac - a duck embryo. She also visits the Sea Gypsies and the amazing Tiboli people that live on Lake Sebu, as well as attending a horsefight. Next, Shilpa travels west to the island of Palawan and the city of Puerta Princesa, where she visits the open prison. North from here in El Nido, cavers risk their liv

star 8.50
4 votes
Directors: Mark Soldinger
Writers:
Indonesia: Bali & Sulawesi

#23 - Indonesia: Bali & Sulawesi

Season 4 - Episode 3 - Aired May 12, 1998

The Indonesian archipelago stretches from the Asian mainland all the way to Australia. Our traveller, Shilpa Mehta explores just two contrasting islands of the thirteen thousand that make up Indonesia – Bali and Sulawes. Starting in Bali, Shilpa arrives in Kuta. She meets an Australian who came to visit in 1974 and never went home. She then checks out Kuta’s beautiful beach, and has a go at surfing, before relaxing with a massage from Kutas’ world famous massage ladies. From Kuta, Shilpa travels by bus to the artists’ village, Ubud, where she has a meal in a warung, an Indonesian café. She also visits the rice fields. Bali is renowned for it’s extraordinary rice terraces and the ones around Ubud are among its most spectacular. Shilpa tries her hand at mask making and learns how important masks are to Hindu sacred stories. Not far from Ubud is the volcano of Gunung Batur. Shilpa climbs Gunung Batur with a guide, cooking breakfast in a volcanic geyser on the way. They catch an amazing sunrise. Heading onto Lovina on the North coast, Shilpa joins tourists hoping to catch a glimpse of dolphins swimming. Before leaving Bali, Shilpa attends the New Year festival. She helps with preparations for the festival where the bad spirits from the old year are scared away, and good luck is ushered in with the new. From Bali, Shilpa catches a cheap flight to the strangely shaped island of Sulawesi. She explores the southern province starting in the capital city of Ujung Pandang, which is the gateway to the Spice Islands. After the tranquillity of Bali, Sulawesi is rather different and there are many reminders that this is a Muslim country. At the port Shilpa works up an appetite shifting flour before hooking up with some local girls who guide her through the bewildering choice of food on offer at the sea front. Shilpa takes a bus to Rantepao in the region of Torajaland, following an inland route that reveals some spectacular scenery along the way. After

star 8.50
4 votes
Paris City Guide

#24 - Paris City Guide

Season 4 - Episode 11 - Aired Sep 27, 1998

Justine Shapiro spends a week in Paris, the capital of France and one of the most cultural and romantic cities in Europe. Justine’s first night in Paris is spent with an old American friend, who now lives in Paris. He takes her to a traditional café, where they enjoy copious amounts of traditional French fare and a few glasses of vin rouge before they join the other customers in their songs that go on till the early hours of the morning. The following day Justine attends a cookery class at the Ecole Cordon Bleu. Cooks from all over the world come here to learn a little about French haute cuisine. In the evening she takes part in an event that reflects a different side of Paris: she joins over 3,000 roller-bladers and their police escorts in their weekly night-time skate through and around the city centre. The architecture of Paris provides some fabulous views, and after her trip to the Arc de Triomphe in the morning, Justine spends the afternoon visiting and climbing some of the more contemporary buildings that Paris is renowned for, such as La Grande Arch de la Defence, L’Opera Bastille, and the Bibliotheque Nationale de France. She also rides the the number 73 bus, which offers some of the best views of Paris for a fraction of the prices charged by official sight seeing buses. Later, Justine attends one of Paris’ most famous shows, the cabaret at the Lido. Justine goes shopping in the markets which cater for Paris’ ethnically diverse population. Here she is shown around by a Ghanaian gentleman, who explains the uses and properties of various African foods. Later, she shops for the goods that Paris is more famous for: with a professional designer she is taken to some of the designer boutiques, although in the end she save her francs and picks up some bargains in the popular store, ‘Tati’. Paris is famous for its galleries and museums that represent both the traditional artistic movements of France, as well as some of its more avant-gar

star 8.50
2 votes
Directors: Caius Julyan
Writers:
Bolivia

#25 - Bolivia

Season 6 - Episode 5 - Aired Jun 21, 2002

Presenter Ian Wright explores Bolivia, one of the poorest countries in Latin America but one of the richest in culture and landscape. His journey begins on Lake Titicaca. It's the highest navigable lake in the world and covers some 3000 square miles, linking Bolivia and Peru. The Island of the Sun is the place where the Inca Empire began and Ian learns that the first Inca married his sister, then convinced the people that they were the children of the sun god who had risen up from the lake. An hour by boat from the Island of the Sun is Copacabana, where every Sunday the locals bring their cars for a blessing by Father Bernadino. The ceremony is Christian but has its roots in the Inca tradition. From Copacabana Ian hitches a ride to La Paz where he hunts out some bargains at the Market of Sagarnaga. Next door is the Witches Market, the place to find bizarre cures for uncommon ailments, such as llama foetus. Ian flies to Sucre and plans to catch a bus to Potosi from there, however there's a bus strike and Ian has to spend the night at an enchanting hacienda just outside town. Next morning he resumes his journey and en route to Potosi he witnesses preparations for a bull fight. He also stops off Tarabuco, famous for its handmade clothes and weavings. At last Ian reaches Potosi, one of the richest cities in South America due to the discovery of silver in the 16th century, by a llama herder called Diego Huallpa. Ian plans to go underground and experience the mines for himself, but first he stops at the miners market to purchase gifts for the miners: cigarettes, alcohol, coca leaves and a few sticks of dynamite! Miners start their career at the age of 8 or 10. They are self-employed and gifts from visitors supplement their meagre incomes. During colonial times millions of African and Indian slaves died due to the harsh conditions in the mines. From Potosi Ian makes his way to Uyuni. Just outside the town is the largest salt flat in the world and Ian hooks u

star 8.50
2 votes